Western United States

The Western United States (also called the American West, the Far West, and the West) is the region comprising the westernmost states of the United States. As American settlement in the U.S. expanded westward, the meaning of the term the West changed. Before about 1800, the crest of the Appalachian Mountains was seen as the western frontier. The frontier moved westward and eventually the lands west of the Mississippi River were considered the West.[5]

Western United States
American West, Far West, the West
Regional definitions vary from source to source. This map reflects the Western United States as defined by the Census Bureau. This region is divided into Mountain and Pacific areas.[1]
Country United States
States
Area
  Total1,873,251.63 sq mi (4,851,699.4 km2)
  Land1,751,053.31 sq mi (4,535,207.3 km2)
Population
  Total78,588,572
  Density42/sq mi (16/km2)
GDP (nominal)
  Total$5.619 trillion (2019)
  per capita$71,719 (2019)

The U.S. Census Bureau's definition of the 13 westernmost states includes the Rocky Mountains and the Great Basin to the Pacific Coast, and the mid-Pacific islands state, Hawaii. To the east of the Western United States is the Midwestern United States and the Southern United States, with Canada to the north, and Mexico to the south.

The West contains several major biomes, including arid and semi-arid plateaus and plains, particularly in the American Southwest; forested mountains, including three major ranges, the Sierra Nevada, the Cascades, and Rocky Mountains; the long coastal shoreline of the American Pacific Coast; and the rainforests of the Pacific Northwest.


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