Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany

The Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany (German: Vertrag über die abschließende Regelung in Bezug auf Deutschland[lower-alpha 1]), or the Two Plus Four Agreement (German: Zwei-plus-Vier-Vertrag;[lower-alpha 2] short: German Treaty), is an international agreement that allowed the reunification of Germany in the early 1990s. It was negotiated in 1990 between the Federal Republic of Germany and the German Democratic Republic (the eponymous Two), and the Four Powers which had occupied Germany at the end of World War II in Europe: France, the Soviet Union, the United Kingdom, and the United States. In the treaty, the Four Powers renounced all rights they held in Germany, allowing a reunited Germany to become fully sovereign the following year.[1][2][3] At the same time, the two German states agreed to confirm their acceptance of the existing border with Poland, and accepted that the borders of Germany after unification would correspond only to the territories then administered by West and East Germany, with the exclusion and renunciation of any other territorial claims (e.g., to the Kaliningrad Oblast).

Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany
TypeIndependence treaty / Peace treaty
Drafted13 February 1990
Signed12 September 1990
LocationMoscow, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union
Effective15 March 1991
SignatoriesTwo
Four
Languages
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Treaty on the Final Settlement with Respect to Germany at Wikisource

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