Paikuli inscription

The Paikuli inscription (Kurdish: پەیکوڵی, romanized: Peykulî,[1] Persian: پایکولی, in Arabic: بيكولي) is a bilingual Parthian and Middle Persian text corpus which was inscribed on the stone blocks of the walls of Paikuli tower; the latter is located in what is now southern part of Iraqi Kurdistan near modern-day Barkal village, Sulaymaniyah Governorate, Iraq (35°5′53.91″N 45°35′25.95″E). These inscribed stone blocks are now in the Sulaymaniyah Museum; the field only contains the stones that were used in the construction of the tower.[2] It was set up as a monument to victory, and tells how and why the Sasanian emperor Narseh (also written Narses) ousted his grandnephew from power.[3]

Paikuli inscription
Paikuli Tower.
Paikuli tower
Location of the Paikuli tower
Paikuli tower
Paikuli tower (Iraq)

In 293 Narses marched from Armenia in open revolt against his nephew with a host of supporters and allies, whose names are recorded on the Paikuli inscription.[4]


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