Lakota people

The Lakota (pronounced [laˈkˣota]; Lakota: Lakȟóta/Lakhóta) are a Native American people. Also known as the Teton Sioux (from Thítȟuŋwaŋ), they are one of the three prominent subcultures of the Sioux people. Their current lands are in North and South Dakota. They speak Lakȟótiyapi—the Lakota language, the westernmost of three closely related languages that belong to the Siouan language family.

Lakota
Sitting Bull, a Hunkpapa Lakota chief and holy man, c. 1831 – December 15, 1890.
Total population
115,000+ enrolled members[1][2][3][4][5] (2015 census)
Regions with significant populations
United States
(North Dakota and South Dakota)
Languages
English, Lakota
Religion
traditional tribal religion
Related ethnic groups
other Sioux peoples (Santee, Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate, Yankton, Yanktonai)[6]

The seven bands or "sub-tribes" of the Lakota are:

Notable Lakota persons include Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake (Sitting Bull) from the Húnkpapȟa, Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya (Touch the Clouds) from the Miniconjou, Heȟáka Sápa (Black Elk) from the Oglála, Maȟpíya Lúta (Red Cloud) from the Oglála, Billy Mills from the Oglála, Tȟašúŋke Witkó (Crazy Horse) from the Oglála and Miniconjou, and Siŋté Glešká (Spotted Tail) from the Brulé. More recent activists include Russell Means from the Oglála.


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