House of Hanover

The House of Hanover (German: Haus Hannover), whose members are known as Hanoverians, is a European royal house of German[1] origin that ruled Hanover, Great Britain, and Ireland at various times during the 17th to 20th centuries. The house originated in 1635 as a cadet branch of the House of Brunswick-Lüneburg, growing in prestige until Hanover became an Electorate in 1692. George I became the first Hanoverian monarch of Great Britain and Ireland in 1714. At Queen Victoria's death in 1901, the throne of the United Kingdom passed to her eldest son Edward VII, a member of the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. The last reigning members of the House lost the Duchy of Brunswick in 1918 when Germany became a republic.

House of Hanover
Arms of the House of Hanover
Parent houseBonifaciObertenghiEsteWelf
Country
EtymologyHanover
Founded1635; 387 years ago (1635)
FounderGeorge, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Current headErnst August, Prince of Hanover
Titles
Deposition

The formal name of the house was the House of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Hanover line.[2] The senior line of Brunswick-Lüneburg, which ruled Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, became extinct in 1884. The House of Hanover is now the only surviving branch of the House of Welf, which is the senior branch of the House of Este. The current head of the House of Hanover is Ernst August, Prince of Hanover.


Share this article:

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article House of Hanover, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.