British America

British America comprised the colonial territories of the English Empire, which after the 1707 union of the Kingdom of England with the Kingdom of Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain became the British Empire, in the Americas from 1607 to 1783. Prior to the union, this was termed English America, excepting Scotland's failed attempts to establish its own colonies. Following the union, these colonies were formally known as British America and the British West Indies before the Thirteen Colonies declared their independence in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) and formed the United States of America.[1]

British America and
the British West Indies
1607–1783
British colonies in continental North America (red) and the island colonies of the British West Indies of the Caribbean Sea (pink)
StatusColonies of England (1607–1707)
Colonies of Scotland
(1629–1632)
Colonies of Great Britain (1707–1783)
CapitalAdministered from London, England
Common languagesEnglish (de facto official)
Spoken languages:
English
German
French
Spanish
Dutch
Swedish
Finnish
Welsh
Cornish
Irish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
Manks
Ojibwe
Indigenous languages
West African languages (spoken among the imported African slaves in the beginning)
Religion
Anglicanism, Protestantism, Lutheranism, Roman Catholicism, Judaism, Native American religions, Traditional African religions, Sunni Islam (practiced by some West African slaves in the beginning)
Demonym(s)British American
GovernmentConstitutional monarchy
Monarch 
 1607 — 1625
James VI and I (first)
 1760 — 1783
George III (last)
History 
1607
1610
 Bermuda
1614
1620
1632
1655
1670
1713
1763
1775–1783
1783
CurrencyPound sterling, Spanish dollar, bills of credit, commodity money, and many local currencies
Preceded by
Succeeded by
New France
New Netherland
New Sweden
Spanish Florida
British North America
United States
Spanish Florida
British West Indies

After the American Revolution, the term British North America was used to refer to the remainder of Great Britain's possessions in North America. The term British North America was used in 1783, but it was more commonly used after the Report on the Affairs of British North America (1839), generally known as the Durham Report.


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