Accordion

Accordions (from 19th-century German Akkordeon, from Akkord—"musical chord, concord of sounds")[1] are a family of box-shaped musical instruments of the bellows-driven free-reed aerophone type ( producing sound as air flows past a reed in a frame), colloquially referred to as a squeezebox. A person who plays the accordion is an accordionist. The concertina and bandoneón are related. The harmonium and American reed organ are in the same family, but are typically larger than an accordion and sit on a surface or the floor.

Accordion
A piano accordion (top) and a button accordion (bottom)
Keyboard instrument
Hornbostel–Sachs classification412.132
(Free-reed aerophone)
DevelopedEarly 19th century
Playing range

Depends on configuration: Right-hand manual

Left-hand manual

Related instruments

Hand-pumped: Bandoneon, concertina, flutina, garmon, trikitixa, Indian harmonium

Foot-pumped: Harmonium, reed organ

Mouth-blown: Claviola, melodica, harmonica, Laotian khene, Chinese shēng, Japanese shō

Electronic reedless instruments:

Digital accordion, Electronium
Musicians
Accordionists (list of accordionists).
More articles or information
Accordion, Chromatic button accordion, Bayan, Diatonic button accordion, Piano accordion, Stradella bass system, Free-bass system, Accordion reed ranks and switches
An accordionist

The accordion is played by compressing or expanding the bellows while pressing buttons or keys, causing pallets to open, which allow air to flow across strips of brass or steel, called reeds. These vibrate to produce sound inside the body. Valves on opposing reeds of each note are used to make the instrument's reeds sound louder without air leaking from each reed block.[notes 1] The performer normally plays the melody on buttons or keys on the right-hand side (referred to as the manual), and the accompaniment on bass or pre-set chord buttons on the left-hand side.

The accordion is widely spread across the world because of the waves of immigration from Europe to the Americas and other regions. In some countries (for example: Argentina, Brazil,[2][3] Colombia, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and Panama) it is used in popular music (for example: tango in Argentina; gaucho, forró, and sertanejo in Brazil; vallenato in Colombia; merengue in the Dominican Republic; and norteño in Mexico), whereas in other regions (such as Europe, North America, and other countries in South America) it tends to be more used for dance-pop and folk music.

In Europe and North America, some popular music acts also make use of the instrument. Additionally, the accordion is used in cajun, zydeco, jazz, and klezmer music, and in both solo and orchestral performances of classical music. The piano accordion is the official city instrument of San Francisco, California.[4] Many conservatories in Europe have classical accordion departments. The oldest name for this group of instruments is harmonika, from the Greek harmonikos, meaning "harmonic, musical". Today, native versions of the name accordion are more common. These names refer to the type of accordion patented by Cyrill Demian, which concerned "automatically coupled chords on the bass side".[5]


Share this article:

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Accordion, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.